Open source status update, May–July 2022

Hi there friends, it’s certainly been a while, and a lot has happened across May, June and July: I left my job, took some time off, and started a new job. I also managed to get a good deal of open source work done, so let’s take a look at that!

Released Hanami 2.0.0.alpha8

Since we’d skipped a month in our releases, I helped get Hanami 2.0.0.alpha8 out the door in May. The biggest change here was that we’d finished relocating the action and view integration code into the hanami gem itself, wrapped up in distinct “application” classes, like Hanami::Application::Action. In the end, this particular naming scheme turned out to be somewhat short lived! Read on for more :)

Resurrected work using dry-effects within hanami-view

As part of an effort to make it easy to use our conventional view “helpers” in all parts of our view layer, I resurrected my work from September 2020(!) on using dry-effects within hanami-view. The idea here was to achieve two things:

  1. To ensure we keep only a single context object for the entire view rendering, allowing its state to be preserved and accessed by all view components (i.e. allowing both templates, partials and parts all to access the very same context object)
  2. To enable access to the current template/partial’s #locals from within the context, which might help make our helpers feel a little more streamlined through implicit access to those locals

I got both of those working (here’s my work in progress), but I discovered the performance had worsened due to the cost of using an effect to access the locals. I took a few extra passes at this, reducing the number of effects to one, and memoziing it, leaving us with improved performance over the main branch, but with a slightly different stance: the single effect is for accessing the context object only, so any helpers, instead of expecting access to locals, will instead only have access to that context. The job from here will be to make sure that the context object we build for Hanami’s views has everything we need for an ergonomic experience working with our helpers. I’m feeling positive about the direction here, but it’ll be a little while before I get back to it. Read on for more on this (again!).

Unified application and slice

The biggest thing I did over this period was to unify Hanami’s Application and Slice. This one took some doing, and I was glad that I had a solid stretch of time to work on it between jobs.

I already wrote about this back in April’s update, noting that I’d settled on the approach of having a composed slice inside the Hanami::Application class to providing slice-like functionality at the application level. This was the approach I continued with, and as I went, I was able to move more and more functionality out of Hanami::Application and into Hanami::Slice, with that composed “application slice” being the thing that preserved the existing application behaviour. At some point, a pattern emerged: the application is a slice, and we could achieve everything we wanted (and more) by turning class Hanami::Application into class Hanami::Application < Hanami::Slice.

Turning the application into a slice sublcass is indeed how I finished the work, and I’m extremely pleased with how it turned out. It’s made slices so much more powerful. Now, each slice can have its own config, its own dedicated settings and routes, can be run on its own as a Rack application, and can even have its own set of child slices.

As a user of Hanami you won’t be required to use all of this per-slice power features, but they’ll be there if or when you want them. This is a great example of progressive disclosure, a principle I follow as much as possible when designing Hanami’s features: a user should be able to work with Hanami in a simple, straightforward way, and then as their needs grow, they can then find additional capabilities waiting to serve them.

Let’s explore this with a concrete example. If you’re building a simple Hanami app, you can start with a single top-level config/settings.rb that defines all of the app’s own settings. This settings object is made available as a "settings" component registration in both the app as well as all its slices. As the app grows and you add a slice or two, you start to add more slice-specific settings to this component. At this point you start to feel a little uncomfortable that settings specific to SliceA are also available inside SliceB and elsewhere. So you wonder, could you go into slices/slice_a/ and drop a dedicated config/settings.rb there? The answer to that is now yes! Create a config/settings.rb inside any slice directory and it will now become a dedicated settings component for that slice alone. This isn’t a detail you had to burden yourself with in order to get started, but it was ready for you when you needed it.

Another big benefit of this code reorganisation is that the particular responsibilities of Hanami::Application are much clearer: its job is to provide the single entrypoint to the app and coordinate the overall boot process; everything else comes as part of it also being a slice. This distinction is made clear through the number of public methods that exist across the two classes: Application now has only 2 distinct public methods, whereas Slice currently brings 27.

There’s plenty more detail over in the pull request: go check it out!

The work here also led to changes across the ecosystem:

This is one the reasons I’m excited about Hanami’s use of the dry-rb gems: it’s pushing them in directions no one has had to take them before. The result is not only the streamlined experience we want for Hanami, but also vastly more powerful underpinnings.

Devised a slimmed down core app structure

While I had my head down working on internal changes like the above, Luca had been thinking about Hanami 2 adoption and the first run user experience. As we had opted for a slices-only approach for the duration of our alpha releases, it meant a fairly bulky overall app structure: every slice came with multiple deeply nested files. This might be overwhelming to new users, as well as feeling like overkill for apps that are intended to start small and stay small.

To this end, we agreed upon a stripped back starter structure. Here’s how it looks at its core (ignoring tests and other general Ruby files):

├── app/
│   ├── action.rb
│   └── actions/
├── config/
│   ├── app.rb
│   ├── routes.rb
│   └── settings.rb
├── config.ru
└── lib/
    ├── my_app/
    │   └── types.rb
    └── tasks/

That’s it! Much more lightweight. This approach takes advantage of the Hanami app itself becoming a fully-featured slice, with app/ now as its source directory.

In fact, I took this opportunity to unify the code loading rules for both the app and slices, which makes for a much more intuitive experience. You can now drop any ruby source file into app/ or a slices/[slice_name]/ slice dir and it will be loaded in the same way: starting at the root of each directory, classes defined therein are expected to inhabit the namespace that the app or slice represents, so app/some_class.rb would be MyApp::SomeClass and slices/my_slice/some_class would be MySlice::SomeClass. Hat tip to me of September 2021 for implementing the dry-system namespaces feature that enabled this! 😜

(Yet another little dry-system tweak came out of preparing this too, with Component#file_name now exposed for auto-registration rules).

This new initial structure for starter Hanami 2.0 apps is another example of progressive disclosure in our design. You can start with a simple all-in-one approach, everything inside an app/ directory, and then as various distinct concerns present themselves, you can extract them into dedicated slices as required.

Along with this, some of our names have become shorter! Yes, “application” has become “app” (and Hanami::Application has become Hanami::App, and so on). These shorter names are easier to type, as well as more reflective of the words we tend to use when verbally describing these structures.

We also tweaked our actions and views integration code so that it is automatically available when you inherit directly from Hanami::Action, so it will no longer be necessary to have the verbose Hanami::Application::Action as the superclass for the app’s actions. We also ditched that namespace for both routes and settings too, so now you can just inherit from Hanami::Settings and the like.

Devised a slimmed down release strategy

Any of you following my updates would know by now that the Hanami 2.0 release has been a long time coming. We have ambitious goals, we’re doing our best, and everything is slowly coming together. But as hard as it might’ve been for folks who’re waiting, it’s been doubly so for us, feeling the weight of both the work along with everyone’s expectations.

So to make sure we can focus our efforts and get something out the door sooner rather than later, we decided to stagger our 2.0 release. We’ll start off with an initial 2.0 release centred around hanami, hanami-cli, hanami-controller, and hanami-router (enough to write some very useful API applications, for example), then follow up with a “full stack” 2.1 release including database persistence, views, helpers, assets and everything else.

I’m already feeling empowered by this strategy: 2.0 feels actually achievable now! And all of the other release-related work like updated docs and a migration guide will become correspondingly easier too.

Released Hanami 2.0.0.beta1!

With greater release clarity as well as all the above improvements under our belt, it was time to usher in a new phase of Hanami 2.0 development, so we released 2.0.0.beta1 in July! This new version suffix represents just how close we feel we are to our final vision for 2.0. This is an exciting moment!

And a bunch more

This update is getting rather long, so let me list a bunch of other Hanami improvements I managed to get done:

Outside my Hanami development, a new job and a new computer meant I also took the change to reboot my dotfiles, which are now powered by chezmoi. I can’t speak highly enough of chezmoi, it’s an extremely powerful tool and I’m loving the flexibility it affords!

That’s it from me for now. I’ll come back to you all in another month!

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